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The big direct rendering manager (#) update for # # 5.7 happened.

"[…] Highlights […] i915 enables Tigerlake by default […] i915 and amdgpu have initial OLED backlight support […] vmwgfx add support to enable OpenGL 4 userspace […]"

git.kernel.org/torvalds/c/f36…









"[…] This release contains fixes and new features available up to the # # 5.6 release. […]" # #ables






Ugh, the # # git-commits-head mailing list has only 34 subscribers? Well, in that case it's likely not worth perusing the kernel.org maintainers to include merge commit messages there, which are very informative these days… :-/

vger.kernel.org/vger-lists.htm…

Ha, thx, wasn't aware of that. Thing is: I years ago wrote a script that mail the merge commits to me and it works better, as it seems all newlines are lost in the atom feed makes it hard to ready (and submerges are missing, too – some of those contain valuable details). And I think it would be "the right thing"(tm) if git-commit-head would contain the merge commit these days. Maybe all that's needed is removing a "--no-merges" from some script. But well, if nearly nobody is using that list my time is likely better spend elsewhere…





#lvfs










Remember the big controversy(¹) about privacy issues due to the unique identification number in the #?

Modern # and # CPUs have such a number again. And # # 5.7 will support the AMD implementation: git.kernel.org/torvalds/c/077…

[Edit]For the record: Support for Intels implementation of this PPID (Protected Processor Identification Number) afaics was added to the # years ago already with # 4.10: http://git.kernel.org/linus/3f5a7896[/Edit]

(¹) en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pentium_I…

This entry was edited (3 days ago)

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I had been wondering, with all tracking that occurs today, think browser fingerprints, cross device tracking and such, or Android's Google ad id, how is that worse?

Need to read up on such things again.

Interesting, it looks like something I could patch out from my kernel easily. Or even disable in my BIOS. Gotta check if my CPU does that, first.