Skip to main content

Search

Items tagged with: foss


 
== Deprecation notice ==

If you follow me via Twitter, be advised that I am officially deprecating my Twitter account in favor of https://fosstodon.org/@alexbuzzbee. Twitter will continue to receive cross-posts, but it may break at any time. I may not receive mentions in a timely manner.

 

Matrix Riot


Ich überlege ersthaft #Threema , #Signal und #Wire zu deinstallieren.
Die #Messenger sind nicht schlecht aber da ich kein Google Netzwerk nutze, ziehen die ganzen Messenger ordentlich am Akku.
Riot bietet mir alles was ich brauche Audio / Video und Chat für 1:1 und für Gruppen. Datenversand, E2E Verschlüsselung, etc.

Ein weiterer Pluspunkt ist OpenSource und dies auch bis zum Server. Ich hoste den Matrix Server bei mir Zuhause. Die anderen Messenger sind teilweise auch OpenSource aber der Server meist nicht.

#OpenSource #Foss #Android #it-sicherheit #Riot #Matrix #Metadaten

 

 
3rik wrote: If you love #FreeSoftware, go to a #FLOSS event you have never been before and connect with new people who feel likewise, form resilient communities and build friendships across borders: https://floss.events/2019/Spread the love to use, study, share and improve together! #ilovefs #FOSS #OpenSource #SoftwareLibre #FreeSociety

 
If Software Is Funded from a Public Source for Governments, Its Code Should Be Open Source

If we as citizens pay for it, we should be able to use it.

Perhaps because many free software coders have been outsiders and rebels, less attention is paid to the use of open source in government departments than in other contexts. But it's an important battleground, not least because there are special dynamics at play and lots of good reasons to require open-source software. It's unfortunate that the most famous attempt to convert a government IT system from proprietary code to open source—the city of Munich—proved such a difficult experience. Although last year saw a decision to move back to Windows, that seems to be more a failure of IT management, than of the code itself. Moreover, it's worth remembering that the Munich project began back in 2003, when it was a trailblazer. Today, there are dozens of large-scale migrations, as TechRepublic reports:

Most notable is perhaps the French Gendarmerie, the country's police force, which has switched 70,000 PCs to Gendbuntu, a custom version of the Linux-based OS Ubuntu. In the same country 15 French ministries have made the switch to using LibreOffice, as has the Dutch Ministry of Defence, while the Italian Ministry of Defence will switch more than 100,000 desktops from Microsoft Office to LibreOffice by 2020 and 25,000 PCs at hospitals in Copenhagen will move from Office to LibreOffice.

More are coming through all the time. The Municipality of Tirana, the biggest in Albania, has just announced it is moving thousands of desktops to LibreOffice, and nearly 80% of the city of Barcelona's IT investment this year will be in open source.

One factor driving this uptake by innovative government departments is the potential to cut costs by avoiding constant upgrade fees. But it's important not to overstate the "free as in beer" element here. All major software projects have associated costs of implementation and support. Departments choosing free software simply because they believe it will save lots of money in obvious ways are likely to be disappointed, and that will be bad for open source's reputation and future projects.

And paying for support by a government is not a bad thing at all. Unlike some expensive proprietary software where foreign consultants are often brought in, with open source software can have 100% of the expense going to local support companies who create employment and pay taxes locally. For many governments, the saving on license fees can mean them being able to pay even more for local support and skills development if need be. For local support companies having full access to the source code means being able to fully understand it to solve support problems and even fix it if need be. Open source is NOT purely about saving money, especially for governments. Of course, there is no procurement involved (tenders take time and money) and full control is maintained by that government over the applications it uses.

Of course it takes a mindset change, not only for governments but more importantly for their vendors who will resist not being able to drop their boxes for a marked up profit, as they often do not understand the role they can play in providing support services around open source software (of course that support is open then to any vendor to compete to supply).

See https://www.linuxjournal.com/content/if-software-funded-public-source-its-code-should-be-open-source and also some interesting insight into what happened with the famed Munich turnaround at https://www.techrepublic.com/article/linux-to-windows-10-why-did-munich-switch-and-why-does-it-matter/ (hint: some of the issues could be due to poor and fragmented support).

#FOSS #opensource #government

 
If Software Is Funded from a Public Source for Governments, Its Code Should Be Open Source

If we as citizens pay for it, we should be able to use it.

Perhaps because many free software coders have been outsiders and rebels, less attention is paid to the use of open source in government departments than in other contexts. But it's an important battleground, not least because there are special dynamics at play and lots of good reasons to require open-source software. It's unfortunate that the most famous attempt to convert a government IT system from proprietary code to open source—the city of Munich—proved such a difficult experience. Although last year saw a decision to move back to Windows, that seems to be more a failure of IT management, than of the code itself. Moreover, it's worth remembering that the Munich project began back in 2003, when it was a trailblazer. Today, there are dozens of large-scale migrations, as TechRepublic reports:

Most notable is perhaps the French Gendarmerie, the country's police force, which has switched 70,000 PCs to Gendbuntu, a custom version of the Linux-based OS Ubuntu. In the same country 15 French ministries have made the switch to using LibreOffice, as has the Dutch Ministry of Defence, while the Italian Ministry of Defence will switch more than 100,000 desktops from Microsoft Office to LibreOffice by 2020 and 25,000 PCs at hospitals in Copenhagen will move from Office to LibreOffice.

More are coming through all the time. The Municipality of Tirana, the biggest in Albania, has just announced it is moving thousands of desktops to LibreOffice, and nearly 80% of the city of Barcelona's IT investment this year will be in open source.

One factor driving this uptake by innovative government departments is the potential to cut costs by avoiding constant upgrade fees. But it's important not to overstate the "free as in beer" element here. All major software projects have associated costs of implementation and support. Departments choosing free software simply because they believe it will save lots of money in obvious ways are likely to be disappointed, and that will be bad for open source's reputation and future projects.

And paying for support by a government is not a bad thing at all. Unlike some expensive proprietary software where foreign consultants are often brought in, with open source software can have 100% of the expense going to local support companies who create employment and pay taxes locally. For many governments, the saving on license fees can mean them being able to pay even more for local support and skills development if need be. For local support companies having full access to the source code means being able to fully understand it to solve support problems and even fix it if need be. Open source is NOT purely about saving money, especially for governments. Of course, there is no procurement involved (tenders take time and money) and full control is maintained by that government over the applications it uses.

Of course it takes a mindset change, not only for governments but more importantly for their vendors who will resist not being able to drop their boxes for a marked up profit, as they often do not understand the role they can play in providing support services around open source software (of course that support is open then to any vendor to compete to supply).

See https://www.linuxjournal.com/content/if-software-funded-public-source-its-code-should-be-open-source and also some interesting insight into what happened with the famed Munich turnaround at https://www.techrepublic.com/article/linux-to-windows-10-why-did-munich-switch-and-why-does-it-matter/ (hint: some of the issues could be due to poor and fragmented support).

#FOSS #opensource #government

 
Since I've been asked recently, I've taken the time to label a bunch of #Friendica issues as a good entry points for would-be first time contributors. Feel free to ask any question to @Friendica Developers as well.
#OpenSource #FOSS

 
The problem (wonderful thing?) with #FOSS:

> "Oh, I think I'll try out the Fish shell".
... (hours pass)
> "Oh, this is *almost* perfect, but I can't quite get the prompt right"
... (hours pass)
> "Oh, ok, looks like I've just agreed to submit a PR to fix my issue with the prompt"
#FOSS

 
PineBook Pro: 200-Dollar-Notebook für Open-Source-Betriebssysteme #FOSS #LinuxundOpenSource #Notebook #OpenSource #Pine64 #PineBookPro #Smartphones

 

 
3rik wrote: Great to see a crowded room in the pre-#FOSDEM #policy #meeting. A meeting organised by #OpenForumEurope and @fsfe where policy makers and civil society organisations meet and discuss strategies that promote #FOSS on #European level in 2019.#Elections #Commission #FreeSoftware

 
If you're at #FOSDEM this year, be sure to encourage other people to try out @Mastodon this weekend! There are several instances dedicated to #FreeSoftware and #OpenSource. #FLOSS #FOSS

 
PineBook Pro: 200-Dollar-Notebook für Open-Source-Betriebssysteme #FOSS #LinuxundOpenSource #Notebook #OpenSource #Pine64 #PineBookPro #Smartphones

 
Does anyone know a #foss alternative to Google Docs?

I'm looking for one that allows simultaneous editing—something I use when I'm collaborating my #writing with someone else.

 
I'm in a some kind of dream state. Please,

Don't wake me up.


I'm editing a 4k video on #Gentoo #Linux, using #FOSS #software... It's #Shotcut.
I got quickly into editing just in few hours with the tutorial videos on their site. This is looking good.

 
The #Fedora project and @mairin are seeking their way to a new logo: https://blog.linuxgrrl.com/2019/01/09/which-new-fedora-logo-design-do-you-prefer/
#FOSS #Design
Which new Fedora logo design do you prefer?

 
RT @JoernPL@twitter.comcoo@JoernPL@twitter.com#Bookzilla Bücher kaufen und Free Software fördern! Alle Provisionen gehen lt. Selbstauskunft zu 100% als Spende an die Free Software Foundation Europe @fsfe #FOSS
#FOSS

 
Happy New year to my FOSS friends.
2018 was a great year! Especially with Mastodon in the mix and my interactions with you all here.
Cheers!

I sincerely hope that 2019 is the year of the Linux Desktop ;) #FOSS #HappyNewYear

 
"We cannot start out by building the iPad Pro of the peer-to-peer, free and open Internet. We must build the scrappy Apple computers in the suitcases first. And yet, all the while, we must never forget what our ultimate goal is."

An inspiring 2019 perspective by @aral @indie

https://ar.al/2018/12/07/baby-steps/

#FOSS #commons #peerToPeer #software #ethics #surveillanceCapitalism

 
Dear #35c3: Two things!

1) I rented a flat in central Leipzig (0.5km from the the station). We have a spare room with a double bed, in case 1-2 somebodys are in need of a place to crash. DM for details.

2) The whole point of going to 35C3 is to meet people! So please feel free to find me and ask me about #Mailpile and #PageKite and #Autocrypt and #Iceland and making a living off #FOSS work.

 
I saw this on a comment thread on open source project interaction with community members (and vice versa). I’d say it nails it! #programming #foss #opensource
Image/Photo